March 20, 2017

From the Well

Jesus loves, ministers to, cares for, welcomes, breaks bread with, and respects the innate dignity of outsiders. The poor, the sick, people with bad reputations, religious and social outcasts—in the New Testament we see Jesus going to people whose neighbors rejected them with gracious Good News of hope, healing, new life, and salvation.

Today’s scripture lesson from John’s 4th chapter illustrates this gospel truth beautifully.

Jesus was on the move. He had entered Samaria, the home to a people who looked like and believed like Jews on almost every point. But as is so often the case in what are essentially family disputes, the few points of contrast between Samaritans and Jews had, in the minds of many, created an impregnable barrier.

Samaritans and Jews weren’t supposed to interact with one another—a social convention that sets the stage for Jesus’ barrier breaking actions. So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar, near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob’s well was there, and Jesus, tired out by his journey, was sitting by the well. It was about noon.

A Samaritan woman came to draw water, and Jesus said to her, ‘Give me a drink’. (His disciples had gone to the city to buy food.) The Samaritan woman said to him, ‘How is it that you, a Jew, ask a drink of me, a woman of Samaria?’ (Jews do not share things in common with Samaritans.)

The barrier that said Jews couldn’t talk to Samaritans—Jesus tore it down by being honest about his own needs. He was thirsty.

[He] answered her, ‘If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, “Give me a drink”, you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.’ The woman said to him, ‘Sir, you have no bucket, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? Are you greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us the well, and with his sons and his flocks drank from it?’ Jesus said to her, ‘Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, but those who drink of the water that I will give them will never be thirsty. The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life.’

The barrier that said God’s grace is only offered to a select few—Jesus tore it down with Good News—“ask, and you will receive living water.”
Jesus said to her, ‘Go, call your husband, and come back.’ The woman answered him, ‘I have no husband.’ Jesus said to her, ‘You are right in saying, “I have no husband”; for you have had five husbands, and the one you have now is not your husband. What you have said is true!’ The woman said to him, ‘Sir, I see that you are a prophet.
The barrier that said holy people should judge, shun, and reject people they’ve deemed of questionable moral fiber—Jesus tore it down by inviting the woman to see that in the presence of true holiness we can all be honest about where we’ve been and the things we’ve been through.

Jesus was on the move, and barriers were coming down. One whose gender, religion, and past relationships pushed her to the fringes of acceptable society learned from Jesus that there was still a place for her near to the heart of God.

It’s in that place, created by grace, that we encounter God’s word today.

Jesus comes to us, just as he came to the woman at the well, with Good News of reconciliation and hope in his name.

He comes as one who knows our experiences on the margins, knows our weaknesses and failures.

He comes to move us in a new direction.

Jesus says, “The invitation to grace is for all people,” and people like us—people who have accepted that invitation—find our calling and purpose in this truth.

In his life, death, and resurrection Jesus sets us right with God. Through the living presence of his spirit in our hearts, Jesus empowers us to make things right in our community and with one another.

One of my favorite simple statements to describe the Christian life is “We are blessed to be a blessing.” It’s a statement distilled from God’s call to Abram in Genesis’ 12th chapter. We heard that story last week, but the teaching itself gives shape to the totality of our discipleship.

“We are blessed.”—this simple statement affirms that God has done something significant in our lives.

God has dealt graciously with us.

God loves us.

God is invested in us.

God has blessed us, and blessings produce a calling.

“We are blessed to be a blessing.”—this affirms that a blessing must be shared to be truly received, and while each one of us should consider the unique blessings of God in our lives—your spiritual gifts, talents, treasures, desires—there is a blessing and purpose shared by all people to whom the Christ has come—reconciliation.

We are blessed to be a blessing.

We are reconciled to God to be agents of reconciliation in the world.

God proves his love for us in that while we were still sinners Christ died for us…For if while we where enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, much more surely, having been reconciled, will we be saved by his life.
That’s how Paul put it in his letter to the Romans, or, on another occasion, as he encouraged the Corinthians.
From now on, therefore, we regard no one from a human point of view... So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting the message of reconciliation to us. So we are ambassadors for Christ.
We are blessed to be a blessing—reconciled to be God’s agents and Christ’s ambassadors for reconciliation.

This is the truth about why we Pass the Peace every Sunday morning during worship. In that ritual, we give flesh and action to a sublime thought—the idea that the news of God’s love for us is so liberating, so transformational, so powerful, that it propels us to live peacefully and graciously with one another.

Think about that. Who will have their load lightened this week, who will feel their spirited lifted, who will be blessed because of the Good News you’ve heard here today?

The woman as the well knew the answer.

After she met Jesus, after he showed her that the walls that once surrounded her could no longer hold her, she knew exactly what to do.

She shared her blessing with her community.

Many Samaritans from that city believed in him because of the woman’s testimony, ‘He told me everything I have ever done.’ So when the Samaritans came to him, they asked him to stay with them; and he stayed there for two days. And many more believed because of his word. They said to the woman, ‘It is no longer because of what you said that we believe, for we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this is truly the Savior of the world.’
The woman at the well knew that the barriers in her life had come down, and they could come down in her neighbors’ lives, too. She became an ambassador of Good News.

When Jesus sat down at Jacob’s well, he called us to get up and go to our neighbors, as well. As his disciples, therefore, we must live in the light he shines on all people.

We must leave the ways and walls of division behind and work with Jesus for the community he builds—the community where all are welcome, where the spirit and truth invigorate honest worship and humble hearts, where we drink from thirst quenching living waters of grace and invite others to do the same—“for we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this is truly the Savior of the world.”

Thanks be to God. Amen.

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